16 Feb

Robinson Ministry update – 16th February 2018

Morning all!

Well, the days are hotting up here. Cold season is coming to an end and we are entering the hottest months of the year. Thankfully here in Jos our altitude keeps the heat from becoming too unbearable but we do still tend to get more tired than usual.

I have had a busy few weeks with a lot of work needing to be done to get the Nigeria entries for next edition of the Ethnologue for Africa ready. The Ethnologue lists all the known languages of the world with a bit of information about each one like the number of speakers, exactly where it is spoken, whether it has any dialects etc. There is an online version here that you can explore. See if you can find out how many languages are spoken in Nigeria!

We also had our annual tomato canning extravaganza a few weeks ago when we buy bushels of tomatoes and onions and green peppers and make enough salsa and pasta sauce and canned whole tomatoes to last us the year!

PC: Jonathan Barnhoorn

PC: Jonathan Barnhoorn

Tim spent the day out in the Koro area (between here and Abuja) last week in order to meet with one of the language committees from the language projects in that area. He has been working with them and the project advisor to help the community really take ownership of the translation work in their language. If they truly own the work then they will truly own the scriptures that are produced and really value them.

“Is it a success” can be a challenging question to answer at times.  In a couple of weeks (25th Feb) Tim and Michael Harrar our colleague will be travelling out to Niger State to meet with several other language project teams to trial a project assessment tool.   They will be away for about a week this time as it is quite a bit further away so please pray for safe travels for them. 

Dan just got the results of a practice SAT (the American variety that apparently is quite different to the British one!) that he sat before Christmas. He did very well, coming in the top 2% of all those who took the test across the world. He starts High School next year and we are starting to try and work out what sort of choices he will need to make in order to have the option of going to university in the UK with what will be an American High School diploma.

I have been struggling with low energy for about a week now as a result of forgetting to take my thyroxine for ten days. I feel like I am finally starting to come out of the brain fog and bone weariness and looking forward to getting back up to normal strength!

Praise

  • Tim being able to use his skills to help language communities really engage with and take ownership of the scripture translation in their language.
  • I was able to make a lot of updates and improve the information about Nigerian languages for the forthcoming edition of the Ethnologue.
  • Dan getting great results in his practice SAT.

Prayer

  • Safe travel for Tim as he goes to Niger State from the 25th Feb to the 4th March.
  • For me to get back to full energy.
  • That we will all continue to trust God and know his peace.
25 Jan

Scripture Reading Listening Groups having an Impact

There is loads of exciting things going on in Nigeria!

Scripture Reading Listening Groups  (SLRG) are helping many oral communities access their translations.

SLRGs: Bible Study for Non-Readers from benandren on Vimeo.

11 Jan

Robinson ministry update – 11th Jan 2018

Happy New Year!

I love the fact that, here in Nigeria, the first time you see a person in the new year, you greet them with “Happy New Year!” It could be June, but if it is the first time you see them that year then “Happy New Year!” So, although 2018 may be starting to feel less than shiny new to you by now, we greet you with a Happy New Year!

We had a busy but surprisingly restful Christmas break. I say surprisingly because looking into it I was concerned by the very low number of days that were not already filled up. I like time to chill out at home without too much planned and there was a noticeable lack of those sort of days! However, God is good and he gave us rest in other ways this Christmas.

We were able to take a short trip to a game reserve about 3 hours drive north-east of Jos with several other families. There is a hot spring there which feeds a beautiful river with a white sandy bottom that stays at a beautiful 31C. We spent most of our time there in the water, relaxing, swimming, snorkelling, chatting. We then had a fairly quiet New Year back in Jos with a New Year’s Eve BBQ (something that would have been distinctly chilly in the UK!).

After New Year we spent about 4 days at a retreat centre in Miango, about half an hour’s drive from Jos for the SIM retreat. SIM is another big mission here in Nigeria and they had asked Tim if he would come and lead the worship for them during their retreat. I helped by doing projection (of words and presentations) and leading a small group. Dan helped by swelling the number of teenagers! Despite having ‘jobs’ to do there we were also able to rest and enjoy hanging out with other missionaries. Tim however took the whole recreation side of things a little too seriously and managed to pick up a bad ankle injury during their annual adults vs youth football match. He is now hobbling around with a brightly coloured ankle. Thankfully one of the SIM missionaries is a physiotherapist and she offered to do a home visit to see Tim in exchange for a good meal. As good meals are not too hard to come by in our house we were very grateful for this offer!

There was another, much more serious, medical issue that we were involved with over the break. An American friend of ours gave birth (in the early hours of New Year’s Day) to a baby girl who quickly developed breathing difficulties and ended up having to have a medical evacuation a few days after she was born. She and her parents are now in South Africa and she is doing so much better. Although the situation was so hard and scary, we were able to see God’s provision time and time again though it. We have a Nurse who recently joined SIL Nigeria, when we have not had one for years previously. He was able to be a massive help in so many ways. The baby needed a passport in order to be able to be evacuated and at one point (when she was on 24 hour oxygen) we thought that she was going to need to be driven to Abuja (the capital, about 5 hours drive from Jos) in order to be issued with one. However the embassy ended up issuing it without requiring this and they even sent representatives to Jos with the passport. We had the impression that only the mum would be able to travel with the baby in the evacuation but in the end the plane was able to take both parents as well as the baby. It is such an encouragement when we can see God’s hand even in the midst of hard times!

CLICK THIS LINK For an exciting story about God using translated scripture to reach people.

We are starting to make plans for our furlough in the UK this summer (June-July 2018). It might seem a little early but we want to see as many of you as possible and that requires serious co-ordination! Thankfully that is one of Tim’s strengths!

Thank you so much for all your prayers for us, we are deeply grateful! If you are able, please take some time to pray for these things:

Praise

  • Rest over a busy Christmas break
  • God’s hand through the baby’s medical evacuation

Prayer

  • That God will continue to heal the baby and bring peace to her parents
  • A good transition back into school and work routine
  • Plans for furlough to take shape in God’s way and time
10 Jan

Does having scripture in one’s heart language really help?

Does having scripture in one’s heart language really help? This is a story of the miraculous work of God, the hard work of men and women and a courageous act by one believer.   Sani (not his real name) has been assisting with some translation workshops over the past year here in West Africa. He is a former Muslim, in fact his father is a former Imam, coming from a people group that is predominantly Muslim.

A few weeks ago, Sani received a phone call from an unknown number. The caller said that he and his four friends were aware of Sani’s work among the Muslim people group they belonged to and that they all shared the same heart language. They wanted Sani to come and meet with them and tell them about Jesus. It wasn’t long into the conversation that as it became apparent that these five may belong to a militant group. Sani began to wonder if this was a trap. He declined to meet because of the risk. The caller phoned again the next day, begging Sani to meet. To help persuade Sani, he related an account of their recent experiences. The five admitted they were leaders of a group that was militant. In fact, they were leading their group of 2500 through the bush to a neighbouring state to launch an attack when they were blocked by a vision of a man in brilliant white whose feet were on the ground and his head in the sky. All five leaders and many of the larger group saw this vision and they wisely retreated. Not to be deterred, they wondered if they had stumbled upon a “holy” trail and decided to proceed by a different way the next day. Again, they were confronted by the same vision. This happened five separate times.

Upon returning to camp, the five leaders took their prayer rugs and separated themselves from the camp and each other to pray and reflect. While sitting alone, a man in white approached the caller,  greeted him and sat down next to him. The visitor began to share all that had recently happened, what was going on in the caller’s head and shared from the scriptures. This baffled the man and finally he said, ‘Who are you and how do you know these things?” The visitor had been sitting with his hands tucked under his arms. He pulled out his hands and displayed them palm forward showing holes in each and proclaimed, “I am Jesus, I have come that you might have salvation and bring salvation to others.” The militant leader fell to his knees and accepted Jesus as his Lord and saviour. The visitor walked away and disappeared into the bush. The newly converted leader got up and ran to the closest of the other four leaders to tell him what had happened but discovered that the other leader had just experienced the same visit. Soon they discovered that all five had the same visit at the same time.

They quickly discussed what they should do next which is when they remembered hearing about Sani, a man that talked about Jesus in their own language. Upon hearing this story and some amount of prayer and discussion with his wife, it was decided that Sani should respond to the invitation regardless of the risk. He drove some ways out of town where he met the caller who then took him by motor bike to their camp. Arriving late at night, he retired to a restless sleep. At daybreak, Sani entered the camp to find 2500 militants assembled and waiting to hear him speak. Even though he is a preacher, something prompted Sani to simply read the scripture. Fortunately, the New Testament had been completed and dedicated six years earlier which meant that Sani could read God’s word to them in their heart language! He read from the book of James. After reading four chapters, he gave an invitation to accept Jesus and all 2500 responded! God’s word is powerful especially when it is in your heart language!

08 Dec

Jesus Film Impact

I (Tim)love popping out of the city to visit language communities that we are somehow working with. A couple months ago the Duya community dedicate the Jesus film in Duya.   I wasn’t able to go to the dedication but I have heard stories!  When I was in the village a few weeks ago a man came to greet us.
Yakubu is a middle-aged bachelor who lives in the village of Ramindop. When he was young, he attended church, but along the way he became disillusioned when he felt that the pastor was abusing his position for personal gain. Although he had been married, his wife died a long time ago and he has since lived alone. Since that time he has developed a reputation as a drunkard and was always involved with the traditional religion.
One day in September, he heard news about the Duya Jesus Film. When someone in the village purchased a copy, and they were watching it in their home, he decided to see what it was all about. Yakubu was struck by the fact that he heard Jesus speaking Duya, and was so impacted that he announced that he would start coming to church again and would get rid of his associations with the traditional religion.

06 Dec

Robinson Ministry Update – 6th December 2017

Greetings from dry, bright, sunny and slightly chilly Jos.

Our thoughts are starting to head towards Christmas. The decorations are up and the plans for Christmas lunch are being worked on (with 5 courses and 16 people expected you have to start early!).  The middle school Christmas concert is coming up and Dan is practising for it by performing drum rolls on any available surface in the house with his drumsticks.

A couple of weekends ago Dan’s class managed to pull off a fabulous pancake breakfast. They sold tickets to the school and mission community, around 300 tickets in total! Then the class (with significant parental and teacher assistance) bought the ingredients and cooked thousands of pancakes which were served on a Saturday morning along with fruit and syrup. What impressed me most was the comments from the Middle School Principal afterwards, she said that the whole class really worked hard and there was no-one attempting to slack off behind the bike sheds (as it were). Quite impressive for a class of 13-14 year olds working from 7am till 10.30am without a break or a breakfast while those around them are stuffing their faces!

Tim was also busy that weekend and left straight from the pancake breakfast to head off to a language community near Abuja.  The Agbari are quite a large language group that SIL has been working with for a good many years. They really value their language and have an annual gathering to celebrate it.  Tim found it encouraging to see the hundreds of people gathered and to hear all the presentations being given in Gbari. You might think that this is no big deal but with over 500 languages in Nigeria there can be a lot of pressure on minority languages. If you have to learn another language in order to speak to someone from outside your area you might end up deciding that it is just not worth it to teach your language to your children, but this is how languages die.

The reason Tim was visiting the Gbari project is that he is taking on a new role (in addition to his current responsibilities) which will allow him to be more directly involved with Language Projects in order to help them plan more effectively and find the support they need to implement to a high standard. More on that next time!

Thank you so much for your prayers and your financial support, we really need them!  Here are some specific things that you could pray about for us.

Praise:

  • Dan and his class pulled off a successful Pancake Breakfast for the community
  • Tim had a safe, successful trip to the Gbari area

Prayer:

  • For Tim settling into his new role and taking time to visit more language projects
  • For rest and peace in the midst of the pre-Christmas busyness
11 Nov

Robinson Ministry Update – 11th November 2017

Good morning from a dry and chilly Jos,

The temperature is dropping, we are down to around 20C first thing in the morning. Might not sound too cold but I am sat here typing this in a fleece jacket!  We have had no rain for well over a month and none likely for another 4 months at least.

Bonfire with a Guy Fawkes burning

Bonfire with a Guy Fawkes burning

We took advantage of the dryness to have a Bonfire Night celebration on our compound. There is something very nice about being able to celebrate Bonfire Night in your shirt sleeves, knowing that you are not going to get rained off! I certainly don’t miss the annual challenge in Britain of can-I-physically-walk-in-the-number-of-layers-needed-to-prevent-me-from-freezing-at-Bonfire-Night.  I did miss the fireworks however. We decided not to attempt any, loud bangs here tend to have rather negative associations.

Tim had an unexpected opportunity to share about Bible Translation at Hillcrest’s Middle & High School chapel (think all-school assembly that parents can show up to) this week. The youth pastor for the school had come down sick and asked Tim to fill in for him.  So Tim put on his youth worker persona and went for it!  We had a lot of brilliant feedback with one Nigerian mum saying that she thought it was the best chapel ever!  Most people, even here in Nigeria, don’t realise just how many languages there are in Nigeria and how few actually have the Bible. Or even how important scripture in your own language is. Nelson Mandela explained it well when he said

If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.

One of the things I have been doing over the past couple of weeks is working through a new way to look at Scripture Need statistics that should help us to get a much better picture of what the remaining needs really are in Nigeria.  These are the former statistics.

Living Nigerian languages: 510
Nigerian languages with a full Bible: 25
Nigerian languages with just a New Testament: 57
Nigerian languages that need translation starting: approximately 240

One of the challenges that we are facing is that traditionally it has been expected that each language will need, at most, one translation.  However we are finding more and more that many of these “languages” are actually made up of “dialects” that each really need their own translation.  As a result we are pretty confident that the true number of translations that need starting is a lot higher than our current estimate of around 240. Thankfully we serve the God of the Impossible!

If you can, please do take a bit of time to pray for us and the work we are involved with.

Praise

  • Things at work are slightly less manic than they were last month.
  • Great time celebrating Bonfire Night with some Brits and some “honorary” Brits.
  • Tim having the opportunity to share about Bible Translation at Hillcrest.
  • That our God is more than capable of meeting the scriptures needs of Nigeria.

Prayer

  • That what Tim shared will stay with both the students and their parents and encourage them to look and see how they can be involved in supporting Bible translation.
  • For all those languages that still have no scripture either published, or even in progress, that God would release his resources to provide for their scripture needs.
28 Oct

Robinson Ministry Update – 27th October 2017

Greetings from Jos!

Well, it has been an interesting month what with a combination of an SIL Nigeria Church Leaders’ Open Day, a couple of trips to the Koro area for Tim, Financial Year End processes, illness, Strategy meetings and a 10 day visit from 7 overseas visitors including one staying in our house with us.  Not to mention Nigerian Independence Day and Dan’s mid-semester break.

Now that I look back I wonder how we fitted it all in!

A few highlights:

Around 150 Church Leaders came to the SIL Nigeria Open Day!  This means that the message of the potential for life transformation through the Bible in people’s heart language is getting out there into the Nigerian church.

Tim Visited 4 langue projects with a fellow SIL Colleague and spent time looking at how the projects are working and how we can adjust some things to work better.   They talked about 5 topics in each place:  Ownership, Partnership, Relationship, Stewardship and Impact. (more pictures) These visits coincided with the dedication of several books in the Nyankpa language. (more pictures) 

A team of 7 people came to visit us and assess and advise on better ways to get the right man-power that is desperately needed in Nigeria to tackle the huge number of remaining translation needs that we have. One of the team, Noel Harrison, a friend of Tim’s family, stayed with us. It was great to get to know him much better and to have the privilege to introduce him to a bit of Nigeria. It was in fact his first time in Africa although he is very well travelled in other parts of the world.  

Tim also got to take the visiting team to visit 2 language projects in the Koro area.  (more pictures) It is always exciting when you can connect those who work in vital administrative roles with the people they are ultimately serving. Sometimes their roles seem very removed from the “cutting edge” but without them there could be no “cutting edge”.

A couple of challenges:

I was down with some sort of stomach virus for about a week, Dan has had a 24 hour vomiting bug and Tim also had a period of being under the weather (sidenote – where on earth does that saying originate from?!).

Financial Year End has been on going with a lot of changes having to be made at the last minute to the set up of the budgets for the new financial year. This has meant Tim pulling several late nighters.

Praise

  • Please thank God for all the things he has enabled us to do this month!
  • For solutions to the not terribly smooth parts of Year End!

Prayer

  • That all things we have been involved with will bear good fruit and ultimately result in more Nigerians with lives changed as a result of better access to God’s transforming word.
  • That we would remain physically and spiritually healthy as we continue to serve. 
18 Oct

Brief update from Robinsons in Nigeria

Greetings from Jos,

We have just heard that four British missionaries have been kidnapped in the south of Nigeria.  This is just to let you know that we are fine and that everyone else in our organisation is fine.  We are in fact all gathered in Jos at the moment for our Strategy Meetings. Please pray for those who have been kidnapped, we don’t know them, but God does. Please also pray for their kidnappers, they desperately need the truth of God’s Word in their lives!

Tim and Ali

15 Oct

It Pierces the Heart

Joyful reactions by villagers to hearing Jeremiah and Habakkuk in their language for the first time in a Christian-minority language group.

In March 2017 about two dozen believers from a language group where Christians are a tiny minority came together to review the translation of Jeremiah and Habakkuk: that is, to do a read-through, make comments and give advice on the draft. It was their first time to encounter this material in their own language, rather than in Hausa, the trade language. Habakkuk is a short three-chapter book; Jeremiah clocks in at 52 chapters. The reviewers were spellbound by Jeremiah.

“It pierces the heart.”

“I feel like I’ve never read this book before.”

“That’s because we’ve never heard it in our language before,”said a retired evangelist soberly.

“You never get tired of hearing it,” said an old white-bearded elder, a wide grin spreading across his face.

“All those years I spent in Bible school,” said a pastor meditatively,

“and yet it’s as if I’ve never read this!”

Later, as everyone was sitting around chatting in the evening, one man commented,
“This book we’ve read puts me in awe of God.”
On the last day, one young man said, “When I’ve read the Bible in Hausa, I’ve never
enjoyed it so much as I have these days reading it in my own language. Now that I’ve
had this experience, I’m really going to pray for the translation team as they
continue this important work.”

Having Scripture in our own language is something many take for granted, and it’s
hard to realize how gripping mother-tongue Scriptures is for someone who has only
ever encountered the Word through the dark glasses of a second language. If you
have the Bible in your own language, thank God for it and pray for those language
groups in Nigeria who are still waiting, that soon they too would have the truth of
the Gospel in a language that pierces their hearts.

Adapted by: Beverly Harrar
Original Author: Rachelle Wenger

%d bloggers like this: