28 Jan

Robinson Ministry Update – 28th Jan 2016

Greetings from a surprisingly cold Jos,
Okay, so not really cold by English standards but our house thermometer reads 19.1oC as I sit here writing this in leggings, a long skirt, socks, vest, long-sleeved top and fleece. Definitely cold for West Africa.

Things are busy at the office at the moment. Tim is still working intensively with the Human Resources team that has a lot of new staff who have joined it recently. Tom Crabtree, the Executive Director of SIL Nigeria and his wife, Robyn, who is the Human Resources team leader, are both travelling to the States for training in a few days. They will be gone for about a month, during most of which Tim will be the Acting Director for SIL Nigeria. During this period we have quite a few new and returning staff arriving in Nigeria. Please pray for Tim, for protection in this temporary role and especially that he will be able to handle well, with grace and wisdom, any issues that might arise.

CWBOWrPW4AA0XYiMost of my (Ali’s) week has been spent updating NigeL, who is our in-house database of information on Nigerian languages and the projects taking place in those languages. With over 500 languages spoken in Nigeria, at least 7 different organisations involved in Bible translation and around 140 actively ongoing projects, it takes a database and quite a bit of work to keep track of it all. The current push is to ensure that the information about language projects is up to date. The reason for this is a meeting taking place on Friday 29th between those 7 organisations called the Language Programs Coordination Forum (LPCF). We hope to be able to provide them with an accurate list of all the active language projects across all the organisations to help the different organisations to coordinate their efforts more easily.

Dan is settling into this term well and doing much better at getting his homework done in a timely fashion. His appetite for books continues unabated. On Fridays afternoons he is allowed to take 5 books out from the library, on Monday morning this week he informed me that he had already finished reading them all despite the fact that at least one of them was over 500 pages long! He is also currently enjoying staying after school one day a week to play basketball.

On the home front, it is tomato season which means it is canning season! Over the next few weeks we plan to can (or is jar a more appropriate term?) enough tomato based pasta sauce (currently cooking on the fire outside), salsa and whole peeled tomatoes to last a year. It is a lot of work but it will mean that we will have a good stock for the months when tomatoes are scarce and expensive and we want to eat bolognaise!

Praise

  • Skilled househelp who will do most of the canning.
    A meeting between the main Bible Translation organisations in Nigeria (LPCF)
  • Prayer

  • Tim’s time as Acting Director over the next month will be blessed
    That the LPCF meeting will be productive and the different organisations will be able to communicate clearly
  • 16 Jan

    Kasem Bible Dedication

    4-IMG_7782A few months ago I (Ali) had the massive privilege of being able to attend the dedication of the Kasem Bible. In fact, this privilege started a long time before that. My parents have worked with the Kasena people to translate the scriptures into their language from before I was born. I was born into that work. I had the privilege of growing up in Kasena-land and realising from a very early age how important the Bible is and therefore how important it is that people can really understand it.

    1-IMG_7180A young Ghanaian man (Bismark) accompanied us up from the South on this trip to the Bible dedication and he was really struggling to understand why my parents would have left everything they knew, all of their family and a comparatively comfort-filled life in the UK to live in the conditions that they first lived in. No electricity, no running water, no phones, small rooms that the sun beat directly on so that Mum admitted that there were times when she thought she was going to die because it was so hot. You have to understand that my mother is not given to over-dramatization. Seeing Bismark wrestle with this understanding brought home to me just how much my parents were willing to sacrifice to serve God. It challenged me to ask if I am willing to sacrifice that much.
    I want to tell you about one of the moments on the trip that had the biggest impact on me.

    3-IMG_7433An old man sits outside under a tree on a rough wooden bench. He has had leprosy for a long time. One of his legs just ends in a stump, the whole foot is missing. His right hand is deformed and close to useless. His clothes are old and worn and his hair is gray. This is what most people would have noticed, with pity, when they first saw him. But when he looks up, his eyes are shining and he smiles broadly. This man is Oscar Ayira, a man who was involved in the translation work for the Kasem Bible at the very start of the work in the late 60s, even before my parents were on the scene. He is an inspiration to me. When we came to bring him a copy of the completed Bible he was so grateful. 5-IMG_8068 He asked if he could pray for us. He prayed in Kasem and although I could not understand all of his words I was in tears, even writing this now my eyes are welling up. This is not a man to be pitied, this man knows and loves God and now has an opportunity to get to know him even better as he sits under the tree and reads God’s Word in the language he understands best. He will teach the children of the compound and they will have the privilege of growing up with good access to God’s Word. They will be the first generation of Kasenas who can read the whole Bible in their language from childhood.

    2-IMG_7430The Kasenas have the Bible, but of course the story does not stop there. The Bible is useless unless we are allowing it to impact us, it has no benefit sat on a shelf. Please pray that for the Kasena people, the Kasem Bible will be the start of a fresh understanding of God, a closer relationship with their awesome creator.

    11 Jan

    Ministry Update – 11th Jan 2016

    Loss . . .
    It comes in many different forms and can leave you reeling and in pain.
    We have experienced two specific losses over the last few weeks. Both very different but both painful.

    The first loss was the death of a close friend of ours (Tim Pickering) who was also Daniel’s God-father. He was in his mid-forties and leaves behind a wife and two young children. It happened very suddenly on the 15th December and we are still in shock.
    Please pray for his wife Kath and children Abigail and Caleb. We feel the distance in the fact that we can’t be there to help Kath or even to give her a hug. But we know that no distance is too far for our prayers to penetrate and that ultimately God can comfort them far better than we can. Still hurts.

    The second loss was far less tragic but will have a big impact on us none the less. When we first came to Nigeria we spent the first three weeks staying with the Holman family: Ian, Lizz and their kids Edward, William and Kathryn (not to mention Harry who has been born since then). Ian and Lizz are both Wycliffe missionary kids, just like Tim and I are, and we became really good friends. On the 30th December they left Jos to return to the UK for the forseeable future. Our whole family will miss them very much.

    Please pray for us as we process these losses.

    Pray
    Comfort and peace for Kath and the kids
    Good transition for the Holman’s as they move to the UK

    Praise
    We serve a faithful God who remains our loving Father even when everything else is falling apart

    02 Jan

    2015 in Nigerian Numbers (and other Bible books).

    Bible Translation is all about resourcing the local church with scripture that people in their community can truly understand, engage with and be transformed by. We can’t count converts or restorations, but we do hear story after story of lives changed. We know that the more people who have access to translated scripture; the more lives are changed by it. In 2015 the following groups having worked tirelessly over many years received translated scripture.

    Portions:
    Tarok Old Testament books – 300 thousand speakers
    Nyankpa Gospel according to Mark – 70 thousand speakers
    Duya Acts of the Apostles – 78 thousand speakers

    New Testaments:
    Tula New Testament – 30 thousand speakers
    Tyap New Testament – 130 thousand speakers

    Between Tyap and Tula who both received their new testaments, 160 thousand speakers were able to understand the Christmas story possibly for the very first time this year — pretty cool. It really opens the doors for evangelism, discipleship, church planting and dozens of other ministries with the church here.

    Obolo man reading his Bible for the first time.

    Obolo man reading his Bible for the first time.

    Bibles:
    Hausa Common Language Bible – 18 million speakers

    The Hausa Common Language is the people’s Hausa, the language that they really speak and understand well. In fact Hausa is a language spoken, usually fluently, by an additional 15 million Nigerians who are not actually Hausas. This means that this translation has the potential to impact 33 million people! The original Hausa translation was like trying to read and understand the King James, okay to a point, but not always the most accessible and useable. Any version of scripture you can really understand easily is far more likely to be used and far more likely to change lives.

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